Central States Archaeological Societies
Central States Archaeological Societies
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Selected Pictures from the 2012 April Journal

See these, and more, in this issue of the Central States Archaeological Societies Journal

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This unusual claystone gorget is a personal find of Larry Johnson. It measures 3 ½ inches in length and is 2 inches in height. One side is covered with engraving all over except for the center area near the drilling. Most of the engraving is cross-hatching, and the maker obviously spent considerable effort to achieve the final result. At left is the reverse of the gorget, which has no engraving. Copper staining is evident on much of the surface. The gorget was found in the Florence, Alabama area, six years ago. Collection of Larry Johnson, Loretto, Tennessee


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Exotic Bird Points, some quite large (e.g. 2cm). Note the excessive decoration and fragility demonstrating the skill involved in the manufacture. Many of these points were not made for, nor can they do any useful work.

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Chipped-stone Guilford axes from the Piedmont of North Carolina. Length ranges from 9-14 cm. The axe in the upper left corner has a bifacial blade on the left end and a blunt and worn hammer-like surface on the other. The two axes in the bottom row are atypical in having a large, rounded bifacial blade at one end and smaller bifacial blade at the other. Collected by the authors in 1967-1970.

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Kenny Resser, above right, shows a frame of fine artifacts found by him field hunting in Kansas. Up close are two Clovis bases, both personal finds. The base on the left measures two inches in length, and was found in Riley County. The colorful base on the right was found in Wabaunsee County. Both exhibit extremely fine workmanship. Kenny is still searching for the other half of the points. Dr. Michael Gramly, in his research at the Vail Site in Maine, discovered matching bases a short distance away from a kill site that produced broken Clovis points. It is assumed the point broke in half during the hunt, and upon returning to the campsite, the Paleo hunter pulled it out of the shaft and tossed it aside. Collection of Kenny Resser, Topeka, Kansas

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One view of the engraved Mississippian Period pottery vessel. It is 7 inches in height and width. On engraved vessels, the artwork is etched with a finely pointed tool, and doesnít go deep into the clay. It is nearly impossible to view the artwork in a one dimensional photograph as it encircles the vessel. Other vessels with similar motifs were found at the Moundville Site in Alabama.

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Shown in profile, the soapstone bowl found in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. It was one of two steatite bowls found at the same location. It measures 8 ½ inches long at the lug-handles, 6 ¾ inches wide, 4 ½ inches high and weighs 4 ½ lbs.