Central States Archaeological Societies
Central States Archaeological Societies
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CSASI V61#1 2014

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

(Selected Pictures from the January Journal)

On the Cover
The Matanzas people lived during the fourth millennium B.C. The name is Spanish and means to “slaughter,” and was taken from West Matanzas in Fulton County, Illinois. They were known for their stone cups, ground stone axes and projectile points. But their most artistic and skillful achievements were their carved bone hairpins. These five pristine examples were found at the Saline River Site in Gallatin County, Illinois. The longest measures 8 inches in length. For the full story, see page 6. Photography by Steven R. Cooper

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will be available April 2018
Message from your Editor   3
Letters to the Editor   4
From Clay to Copper - Minerals and Artifacts of Etowah, Steven R. Cooper   4
Dragonfly
C.J. O’Neill
5
The Matanzas
David L. Lutz
6
Collapse of Prehistoric Midwest Civilizations
E.J. Neiburger
and Sarah Shulman
36
The Story behind a Cameron Parks Banded Slate Birdstone
Bob Burns
42
A Celt Among the Strawberries
Peter G. Murphy
and Alice J. Murphy
48
Found! A Clear Quartz Point
Terry Ravey
49
Stone Age to Solar Age:
The Largest North Carolina Cache
Ron L. Harris
50
The “New” Field
Bill Moody
54
Collections: Museums versus Private
Charlie Wagers
56
An Indian Contact Period Pipe
James E. Maus
57
An Odd Stone Artifact
Stephen Deger
59
Proposed Changes in Projectile Point Typology and
Chronology for Western North Carolina – Part Four
V. Gary Henry
60
A Lesson in Restoration
John McCurdy
62
The Saga of a Giant and Two Dwarfs
David Marolf
64
A Huge Bonus
Gregg Smith
66
Book reviews:
  What Archaeology Reveals About the First Americans
  Who’s Who in Indian Relics # 11
  67
Membership Application   68
Officers and Societies   69
Calendar of Events   72